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of state and what he means to obama foreign policy. we will be talking to a man who put the fate of the keystone pipeline and the fate of the president's hands. we have dave heineman with his approval to give president obama a second chance. we begin with the obama party is campaign to ban assault weapons. they not only want to ban assault weapons but certain handouts. for more on what the democrats are trying to do to our second amendment rights, we bring in shannon bream. reporter: senator dianne feinstein acknowledges that it will be an uphill battle. this new measure would ban the sale and manufacture and transfer and importation of 157 specific garments, along with a broader group of other guns that will meet at a lower threshold for being classified as an assault weapon is the sale and transfer and gifting of anything classified as an assault weapon. >> no weapon is taken from anyone. the purpose is to try up the supply of these weapons over time. therefore there is no sunset on the spell of. reporter: the children in the newtown, connecticut, massacre would likely still be
as the front pages of the paper do you think that is the foreign policy legacy of his first term? >> i think it is. you can't really point to any successes. you heard him in that little sound bite saying we are going to lead. he has been saying the tied of war is receding. it's not reseeding. the tied of war is increasing in all kinds of places like west africa where it hadn't been. the dominance of the united states in the region ever since kissinger is receding. it is the absence of american influence and power which is creating a vacuum into which the jihadists are coming. that's the most important resistance of insurgents is it is in places where we didn't expect it like north africa. it is as if there were jihadists regimes or attacks in central america. that's now the europeans miss it. the number one issue is iran. the prime minister re-elected on tuesday say at the u.n. last year that in spring and summereh a point of no return at which he was announcing israel would have to act. i think obama is going to have to face that either to prevent the israelis in some way or to give a red l
this at all, richard, to discredit the president on foreign policy? >> i have to say that i think that benghazi is largely a function of people who suffer from obama-derangement syndrome, because i think that people who are kind of looking at the facts, does this trace to the white house, and does it trace to the president or the secretary of the state, and i h think that every bit of information that we have so far the answer to all of the questions so far is no. might they keep hammering it? of course, but at the end of the day, i don't believe we will look back in the second term and said, man, they should have gotten that benghazi behind them, because they have. >> and do you think that we will be talking about benghazi coming up? >> we, the facts and the more that the white house and the administration says this happened and by the way, that happened and not just from the partisan perspective, but coming from the state department and so forth, and with all respect, it is the senate role to ask the tough questions and the question is whether or not it is a legitimate con ver
of jockbs and what's happening in north africa and foreign policy, at least not yet. where should they make a move? >> if the president is true to his word, he needs to do something about the economy, about job creation. there are more unemployed or underemployed people in this country today than there were when the president first took office. we've seen a 33% increase in spending on welfare programs. the african-american unemployment rate in this country is double the national average. and nothing that the president is talking about right now seems to be geared toward putting those people back to work. >> i want to put some numbers on the screen right now, it's fox news polling that's new and how the people feel about the president now compared with four years ago. 47% disapprove, compared with 16% four years ago and look at the flip-flop in terms of those who approve there on the screen, and 47-65%, the jobs that you're talking about, maybe point a little to that, but there are other things that you've written about in a column. >> absolutely. look, you have a middle class whose incomes
law. he has been co opted but part of that was because the foreign policy was complicity. they welcomed the muslim brotherhood and the white house doing that. we haven't been serious about getting behind executive forces. we were serious about getting behind anti communist parties in the cold war in europe. recreating that would be a much better way to go in my opinion. >> as you look at that part of the world it is volatile. we know terrorists are there. we know right next door the french are fighting in mali to drive out terrorists there. they have already asked for our help. we have a situation in turkey where we put patriot missiles on the ground to help them out they have a civil war next door playing out inside syria. going forward, i mean it sounds like this needs to be a part of the world where we engage but how do we engage without putting our people in harm's way? >> we should be smart about doing it. we have a relatively new u.s. africa command. that's the over riding story of the past couple of months. the nexus of the islamists insurgency in many ways was cen
of experiences. both in foreign policy and on the crime bill, the '94 crime bill is something he shepherded and his extraordinary ability to deal with senate republicans in a way a lot of people can't. senator reed and mitch mcconnell don't get along that well so i don't read nieg into it other than the president has an eset in the vice president and he's using that asset and he's deploying him well. the thing we should be mindful of is that there's over the next four years there's going to be a lot of tea leaf reading but at the end of the day, you know, the president is using the personing that get a job done and he's done an extraordinary job so far. let me say, passing this legislation will be tough. it's important to put your best feet on the ground there because it's really not -- it's going to be tough to get these bills passed. >> and it's not just ability. the vice president -- and again i worked closely with him for a few years -- he really likes this kind of political dealmaking in a way i don't think the president likes that much. if he's pushed to it he can do it. but the vice
of cool detachment has been his foreign policy hallm k hallmark. they are a catalyst present but not deeply involved. just to start you out on the huge threat of an iranian nuclear weapon, how does that facr into the second term? >> i think it's possible that this year there may be an action by israel against iran. it looked likely last year. i thought it was going to happen. and then it looked less likely. and people i'm speaking to think it is once again a possibility. that changes the entire dynamic. and this administration talks about wanting to shift to asia. sure, that sounds greatest. but i think it will be very difficult to do. especially in that happens. if the israelis decide after their elections that they are moving a little bit more to the right, if the iranian elections coming up bring that country even further to the right, it seems like some sort of clash is coming. that's just on the israel-iran. if you look -- broaden out a little bit, then you have syria, which is in state collapse, and is probably going to be in some sort of state of anarchy over the next
foreign policy agenda. >> what was hillary clinton's initial reaction when you told her, look, they're considering you as a possibility for secretary of state? >> she didn't believe it. >> fell leap is one of clinton's closest aides. >> i e-mailed her, i think it was the friday after election day, after hearing it from two reporters and i'm pretty sure her rely was something along the lines of not for a million reasons. >> if she was hesitant why not just say no? >> i think she did, or came awfully close. i think the president was very persuasive. >> we're delighted to welcome senator clinton, secretary of state designate. >> clinton was quickly confirmed but how would she get along with the man who defeated her campaign? could she work for him? >> everyone expected, including myself, that there would be a lot of division, a lot of secretary clinton going behind the president's back. >> was there any tension coming in between the two people at the top? >> i think everyone's been surprised. >> surprised that while secretary clinton and president obama have been separated often as she
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
the speech, however, briep, was the absence of foreign policy. and the two really contentious appointments, or at least one is chuck hagel who is going to run the defense department. and the middle east is aflame again and now we're seeing it spread into africa in a way that is very hard to get a fix for what the model is dealing with it. these are failed states. we have tribalism again prevailing in africa and again in the middle east because islamic rage has not been distinguished. command and control of al qaeda they believe has been broken down, but as you saw in algeria in the past several days, this is going to be a continuing problem out there. that will go to the defense department, how it's run, how much money they have to spend, how they reorganized the response of that and secretary kerry would is going to pick up the baton from hillary clinton has to decide what's our relationship with egypt? how run by a muslim brotherhood. >> it's worth remarking on that because four years ago, as we all sat here, none of us expected every assumption you would make about the middle east for d
into the north africa region years ago. i'm afraid our foreign policy has not kept up. >> heather: and that's what i want to ask you about, the foreign policy. for months, u.s. officials, we have intensively lobbied algeria, whose military is by far the strongest in north africa, i think you would agree. we've lobbied them to intervene in next door mali where the rebels have established this well defended base of operations. why, in your opinion, have they not acted and why did they shun outside help in dealing with this latest hostage crisis? >> because they don't view it in their personal interest. the algerian government and military, they are very efficient. the military is very efficient. they're not subtle, as we've seen from the attack on the facility. we shouldn't be surprised at their aggressive reaction to this. they've been fighting extremist concerns for decade. but i think what it points out is again, we don't have much leverage there. you're right, we have been lobbying algeria hard to take a lead role in trying to recapture northern mali, but they don't view it that way. they
to one another must be equally as well. >> reporter: foreign policy was noticeably absent from his address though he harolded a decade of war, touting a recovering economy and acknowledged the lessons still ahead. >> the commitments we make to each other, these things do not sap our nation. they strengthen us. >> reporter: he gave mitt romney this line. >> they do not make us a nation of tears. ♪ la >> reporter: filling the air what patriotism, kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ the brave there was a poem and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the country. john? >> dan, that moment at the end of your piece where the president turned around and look
was in many ways provided the intellectual framework particularly for a lot of bush foreign policy. vice president biden used the senate and the relationships there and his practical skills has been invaluable in terms of promoting the agenda. >> now we have the marine band about to introduce the vice president of the united states. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, the vice president of the united states, joseph r. biden, accompanied by inaugural coordinator for the joint congressional committee on ceremonies, kelly fado. senate department sergeant at arms, martina bradford. house saght at arms carry handley. harry reed and nancy pelosi. >> i said that was the marine band. it was the u.s. army herald trumpets. >> have to get that right. >> what were you saying mark? joe, joe, joe? >> i think this concerns what we were talking about. >> our first glimpse of the president as he walks through the hall, accompanied as you can see behind by chuck schumer head of the joint committee and next to him, lamar alexander of the bipartisanship on display and behind him the leadership of the house
of using it as an extension of their foreign policy. they have generally been fuelling and funding this for many decades. the algearians need to be confronted. if you are going to be taken seriously, you cannot support terrorist groups either inside or outside their borders. >> michael: and the about that they operated almost unilaterally in trying to free the hostages speaks to that they need to be confronted on that. the book is "leading from behind." richard miniter thanks for being here in "the war room." coming up it's the one time americans get to say to the british, see we can do pomp and circumstance just as well as you can. and republican leaders are on a secret retreat. we'll let you in on that secret. and later, the man, the myth, the legend that's right joe biden's exploits are pit to paper. it's a friday night in "the war room," and we're just getting started, so stick around. [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? irene
on policy during the great depression, specifically how the fed could have handled things better. in fact, in 2000, he wrote a paper entitled a crash course for central bankers, which was published in foreign policy. he has a deep and longstanding commitment as well to education. he recently took a timeout to do a town hall meeting for k-12 teachers. so i am particularly pleased to say that, joining us in the audience, is an advanced placement economic class from a high school. we're delighted to have you with us. a word about our format. for the first portion of our time, dr. bernanke will join me here on the stage in a conversation about a number of economic issues. for the rest of the time, he has graciously agreed to take questions from the audience. around 4:30, our staff will be coming through the aisle to get question cards from you. those watching on line and those of you in the audience are welcome to tweet your questions as well. we will select questions, along with two of our graduates students. it is my great pleasure and honor to welcome to the stage chairman ben bernanke. [a
might have climate change, the foreign policy or restructuring of america's place in the world. prams leading from the back as he said in stern phases rather than the front. i'm in favor of that. i think the days of america having to be the global policeman should be over. what else do you see as priorities? >> immigration reform. the president feels strongly about it and will tackle it this year. there's common sense agreement out in the states how to do it. i think you'll see the president work passionately across party lines on education to make our k through 12 system the best in the world like our university system is. you hit the biggest one and that's economy. we have to continue to take steps. >> does everything flow from the economy? >> absolutely. >> talks about education is if we're going to be competitive, we have to do a better job on education. we've got to control our energy in the future. we've got to develop new sources of energy. we've got to invest in research and development and stay on the cutting edge of innovation. all these things are an sbintegl part of develo
that existed in june of 2006 is considered success. and it is not. this continues to be a terrible foreign policy mistake. and now we are confronted with the question, how do we clean up the mess. >> senator obama knew he needed to have a presidential level of credibility in such hearings. republican senator marco rubio has been talking tough about benghazi for months. >> one of the narratives that the obama campaign has laid out, osama bin laden is dead, they e retreated. you start to say do they allow any story to emerge that counters that narrative. is that why they told us that benghazi was a popular uprising, because it ran counter to their campaign narrative. >> and so the pressure was on senator rubio to deliver to all his fans all the fire and brim stone they had a right to expect. he was not just facing the secretary of state, who took responsibility for what happened in benghazi. he was facing possibly the next democratic nominee for president. tonight, the marco rubio fans could not be more disappointed. >> one of the things that i'm more interested in exploring to you, how inf
for the president's pick as the new secretary of state with foreign policy hot spots around the world. only getting hotter. tonight on "special report," we will look at the channels awaiting senator kerry if as expected he is confirmed next week. kerry faced mostly friendly questioning during today's session. the current secretary of state is criticized for a lack of consistency in her statements wednesday about last year's libya terror attack. we'll go over some of the inconsistencies tonight. brit hume will have analysis of clinton's tenure. wheels are in motion for women to serve on the front line of combat position. the change was officially announced today. does president obama really want to annihilate the republican party in "special report" from washington starts at 6:00 eastern. now back to new york and my colleagues with "the five." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> greg: disgusting. >> dana: you're disgusting. >> greg: that is a sick song. >> dana: can i do my segment? we're going to talk about you. soda ban about to go in effect in new york city but has new opposition that used to be for it. they were
and others. >> i think from a foreign policy standpoint, the attention torn back to the middle east. it just will. my prediction is that we'll have the domestic fights but i think on the danger front i think sort of what the arab spring evolves in to, we don't know and it's a big x factor. >> what we're waiting for. grambling university marching band. lynyrd skynyrd performing. do you like him? >> sure. i don't know that i'm quite as enthusiastic about the music as you are but -- >> very enthusiastic. >> for those that don't know, wolf once had a band called the monkeys before the monkees. >> that's right. >> we have to tie him to the chair and waiting for the president and the vice president speaking at the candle light celebration. let's go to a break with grambling university and the marching band. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is joe woods' first day of work. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great
. the important foreign-policy issue of benghazi. it was something we were talking about a month ago, but it faded into the background. everybody will be watching tomorrow. it is a big deal to have the secretary of state come in. everyone wants to hear what she has to say about this. she becomes less of a focus because she's leaving, some say. but it will be really important hearing. the group publicans' want a special committee formed to investigate the because the issue, but they did not get that. all we will crb hearings where we get a picture of it from people who were heading the operation. so her parents will be very big tomorrow. guest: more broadly, on national security, we will enter the beginning of confirmation hearings for john kerry as secretary of state, chuck hagel as secretary of defense. consideration of our military strategy, our military spending, how we project american power as we complete a winding down of the war in afghanistan. it is really going to be the end of a post-9/11 period in national security policy, with the policy going for it from there still unsettled. guest:
administration's foreign policy and i urge his sped deacon firm mags. >> before leaving, just like her first day on the job four years ago -- >> i am absolutely honored and thrilled beyond words to be here with you. >> clinton is likely to say good-bye to the diplomat she's led and deliver a major speech on international policy. but her last days as america's high-flying top diplomat have been overshadowed by nearly a month of illness, the fallout over the deadly attack in benghazi. >> i think it's inexcusable that you did not know about this and that you did not read these cables. >> and her impassioned defense. >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened. >> i don't think it will be part of her legacy. >> beyond benghazi, former secretary of state madeleine albright says clinton did something big for america's foreign policy. >> i think she will be valued greatly for finding other parts than just military power for america the way that we use our influence. >> others, while praising clinton personally, charge the administration she's part of, failed
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
think there was a pretty strong sense today that not just on domestic policy, but even on some foreign policy, he moved. sometimes the criticism was he kept a little too much of bush, this was a breaking point. a lot of what lingered, some of the people, some of the policies seem to be pushed back now. >> was this the speech that liberals have been waiting for? >> sure it was. >> and now is it the foundation for the next several years? >> well, barack obama is a complicated man. we have to be honest about him. >> he is a deal maker. >> yeah, he is. and he is also a mediator. he really does believe in trying to bring people together. so we can't tell ourselves that he is going to give us everything we want. but what i thought from this speech was that he was saying, look, i know where you're at, the people who elected me. i know the coalition that elected me. if you keep the noise up, if you keep talking about this, i'll take care of you. i will watch for you. and he wasn't tossing them all under the bus. this was not a hey, i know you elected me, but now i can't do much for you. >> was
woods, a co-director of foreign policy in focus at the institute for policy studies. welcome to "democracy now!" let's start off with the hostage situation in algeria. what do you understand at this point? >> first, i think we have to extend condolences to those families of those to a lost life. situation is fluid. hostages reportedly have been taken coming from at least eight different countries, including britain, japan, ireland. there are still reports that not only those that have been killed coming potentially from britain, france, japan and other countries, but also this is a crisis that is still under way. the algerian military is still seeing this as an ongoing incident. the information is scant t and fluid, changing very rapidly. it is coming out very slowly because of -- remember, algeria is essentially a military state. information is not flowing freely. there is a reluctance to share information with international actors, particularly former colonial powers, given the history of what has happened in algeria. >> the reports are coming out initially saying many of t
if there is a legacy on foreign policy other than the important moment of taking on -- >> it lets us take note in a way of the way the first family has lived their life in the white house, one thing that you noted is that the obamas like to go out to restaurants and eat out as opposed to the bushes who entertained inside the white house. how does that change the washington scene, do you think? >> i think there's almost been less of that, too. as time went on, there was a newness when they moved into their new city and their new community and they wanted to get out and about and be seen as members of our community family here in washington. but the reality is, it does get very hard to make the movements outside of the white house to disrupt the flow of traffic. although, it is an exciting moment, you know, from time to time when they are able to do that. so, i think, you know, the way you live your life before you came here is the way you try to live your life when you are here. >> you worked very closely with laura bush. >> i did. >> i'm just curious, this is the president's day and the vice president'
bit about foreign policy and maybe a tiny bit about 2016. oh! progress-oh! -oh! -oh! oh! oh! ♪ what do you know? oh! ♪ bacon? -oh! -oh! oh! [ female announcer ] with 40 delicious progresso soups at 100 calories or less, there are plenty of reasons people are saying "progress-oh!" share your story for a chance to win a progress-oh! makeover in hollywood. go to facebook.com/progresso to enter. >>> we are back with former senator russ feingold, former house speaker newt gingrich and the stellar susan page and ron brownstein. thank you all for being here. i want to play you -- this is a couple of bits of the president talking about al qaeda and terrorism. >> al qaeda is on the path to defeat. war in afghanistan is winding down. al qaeda has been decimated. al qaeda's on the run and bin laden is dead. >> so my question out of this is algeria. northern africa has now, for a long time, we heard about yemen and somalia, places like that, but now hearing about algeria, mali. what -- it seems like it has become or been allowed to become a very dangerous place. >> this is something i worked on
down on paper earlier. economy, obviously. you might have climate change. >> right. >> the foreign policy, the restructuring if you like of america's place in the world, taking on where barack obama has taken it so far. very interesting. perhaps leading from the back as he said in certain cases rather than from the front. i think the days of america having to be the global policeman should be over. what else do you see as priorities? >> immigration reform. the president feels strongly about we'll tackle this year. everyone out there understands our system is broken. and we need some fundamental restructuring of it. right thing to do. there's common sense agreement out in the states on how to do it. people putting politics aside. i think you will see the president in the second term work passionately across party lines on education to make the k-12 system the best in the world like the university system is. you hit the biggest one, that's the economy. we have to continue to take the steps -- >> does everything flow from the economy? >> absolutely. >> as a government -- >> talks abou
of how progressive this message was is the foreign policy piece. advocating for engagement against the backdrop of a hostage situation in algeria is a very firm flag to plant in the ground. to say that as we see al qaeda cells multiplying, taking over a host of failed states in north africa and now west africa. to say these are not our enemies, that we can come in peace, that we can have peaceable relations with evil actors in the world is very much obama 1.0. for him to say that now i thought was really, really remarkable if you're talking about hawk versus dove, progressive versus conservative. >> i thought that was a direct message to the mullahs and to the people of iran. i spent some time with one family this week. i think he knows that the worst case scenario is war, it always is the worst case scenario and he's hoping somehow we can stop them from weaponizing. >> but chris -- >> nuclear weapons. >> i think this was a forthrightly liberal speech. i think that -- >> you're an eight. >> he said we are a country that doesn't -- that believes that every citizen deserves a decent
years and you saw he lost some foreign policy issuei. if the first year, he was dominant. and he was not as big a force in the republican party because people knew he was not going to be on the electoral battlefield. >> i think that's right, john. from his point of view, what he also -- he has to worry not only about whether hillary clinton's going to get in, not only about his own age and health, he has to worry about the overall success of this partnership. he has a very strong self-interest in seeing barack obama succeed. as you well know, after eight years of one party being in office, it's not easy to hold on to that office. and one of the things that helped to elect george h.w. bush at the end of reagan was reagan went out on a high. he had some trouble in the second term but he went out on a high. and that really helped bush. i think that's important for biden that president obama succeed. >> i just missed this one but the last vice president before george h.w. bush was martin van buren. >> biden has constantly been in and out of the dog house for say things he wasn't supp
for the president. it's on foreign policy but it's on what's happening now in north africa. we had benghazi and now algeria and northern mali with the french. does he need to do more with north africa? >> i think the mistake the president gave was giving the appearance that the war against al qaeda was over. right now it's basically al qaeda in the ma grghreb in nort africa. i think the president should do more. he should focus on it more and make it clear to the american people. we may have to take some kind of action. the american people won't know what's happening because the president isn't talking about it. i think he has to lay the groundwork we have a serious situation that in many ways al qaeda is stronger than it was ten years ago. now it's metastasized and morphed. >> you're the chairman of the homeland -- >> actually i'm not anymore. i'm term limited out. >> still on the committee. before the first obama inaugural there was a lot of chatter. it seems pretty quiet. security officials say they feel much more confident. have you heard anything? >> for all i know -- as far as i know everythi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)